Passeggeri trattati come bagagli?

AICEX: interessante punto di vista – 

If, when you fly, you have the feeling that you are being treated like cargo, you’re wrong.

The cargo is treated like cargo—and cargo is nice to airlines. Cargo doesn’t quibble about crowded conditions or expect special treatment. Cargo doesn’t get rowdy and problematic in-flight. Cargo doesn’t require cabin crew to cater to its needs. Most importantly, cargo pays well.

It represents between 15%-20% of the average airline’s earnings. Though that may not seem a lot, once a flight covers its costs with passenger capacity, any income from cargo goes to profits. Unlike more fare-sensitive passengers, cargo customers will pay a premium for the expedited and flexible point-to-point service afforded by an airline’s network.

Several factors affect just how much cargo an airline can fit on board: the type of aircraft, that aircraft’s tonnage capacity and available hold space, the weight of the fuel required for the flihgt and the space taken up by extra fuel storage, the weight of the mail the airline is committed to carry, and our luggage. Airlines ensure there’s weight capacity available for that profitable cargo by reducing the constant: the fixed weight load the aircraft with all its components and by managing luggage allowances.

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