Ecco come Disney World domina la customer experience

AICEX: E’ sufficiente leggere i giornali per pensare che talvolta la realtà supera la fantasia. Devono averlo pensato anche in Disney, perché con le nuove attrazioni a tema su Star Wars  è davvero difficile distinguere tra l’una e l’altra, perché tu stesso, in realtà, fai parte della fantasia.

If there’s one company that knows a thing or two about keeping its customers happy, it’s Disney.
This is reflected in the increasing demand for the Disney experience. In 2018 – a record year for worldwide theme park attendance – Disney saw attendance grow 4.9% from 150 million visits to 157 million visits. What’s more, revenue from Disney Parks and Resorts increased 5% year-over-year in Q2 2019, boosted by a 4% rise in average guest spending in US parks.

Delivering a great customer experience might seem like an easy task for the ‘happiest place on earth’, but Disney uses much more to delight visitors than Mickey Mouse pancakes.

Let’s take a look at how we might learn from Disney’s approach to customer experience. Continue reading “Ecco come Disney World domina la customer experience”

Nel customer service “no problem” nasconde un problema.

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AICEX: capita spesso che quando un cliente ringrazia una persona del customer service dopo un suo intervento risolutivo si senta rispondere “nessun problema”. Ma è proprio quando ti chiedono di non pensare ad un orso bianco che cominci a pensarci. In maniera analoga, di quella interazione con il customer service, al cliente potrebbe rimanere in mente un problema.

There’s a two-word phrase that tends to drive customer service experts, trainers, speakers, and thought leaders crazy, myself included. The phrase is “no problem”:

Customer: ‘Thank you.’
Customer service employee: ‘No problem.’
Customer service expert/trainer/thought leader: ‘ARGGH–you’re making my head explode!’

So what makes “no problem” such a problem–if, in fact, it is one? My opinion is that the literal meaning of “no problem” poses a risk that customers will wonder whether they are causing problems at your establishment, and whether they’ll be causing even bigger problems if they are brash enough to make yet another request after the one you just no-problemed.
In other words, you can’t ask people to not think about a pink elephant without making them picture such an elephant immediately. The “no” in the phrase “no problem” has zero evocative power. The “problem” has plenty. Continue reading “Nel customer service “no problem” nasconde un problema.”

McKinsey: come sviluppare la visione della customer experience

AICEX: In questo articolo si evidenziano due temi chiave per avere successo nelle iniziative di customer experience, individuare e gestire ciò che i clienti vogliono davvero (anche se talvolta non lo sanno con precisione), e coinvolgere i dipendenti, soprattutto quelli che con i clienti interagiscono direttamente. Nulla di nuovo sotto al sole, ma allora perché è così difficile avere davvero successo?

A successful customer experience strategy starts with an aspiration centered on what matters to customers and empowering frontline workers to deliver.

Almost every successful company recognizes that it is in the customer-experience business. Organizations committed to this principle are as diverse as the online retail giant Amazon; The Walt Disney Company, from its earliest days operating in a small California studio; and the US Air Force, which uses an exotic B2B-like interface to provide close air support for ground troops under fire. Conversely, companies that are not attuned to a customer-driven marketplace are remarkably easy to spot. Consider the traditional US taxi industry, which is facing significant new competition from the likes of Lyft and Uber. Customer-service standouts clearly understand that this is central to their success as businesses.

Continue reading “McKinsey: come sviluppare la visione della customer experience”